What is a Weser Ems horse?

Horses

What is equine metabolic syndrome (EMS)?

Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a disorder associated with inappropriate blood insulin levels (insulin dysregulation) along with a combination of increased fat deposition and a reduced ability to lose weight.

Can a horse with EMS have PPID?

The pituitary gland is normal in younger horses with EMS, but lesions consistent with PPID may be found in older horses with EMS that are concurrently affected by EMS and PPID. Diagnostic testing for equine metabolic syndrome should concentrate on documenting insulin resistance while excluding PPID.

How to help a thinning horse with EMS?

Thin horses with EMS should receive increased calories in the form of roughage, fat, and possibly protein supplementation. Molasses-free beet pulp, vegetable oils, and low-carbohydrate, moderate protein, higher fat supplements can be used until a desired BCS is reached.

Why do some horses have metabolic syndrome and others don t?

The underlying reason why some horses develop equine metabolic syndrome and others do not is not known. There appears to be a genetic disposition, both within and between breeds. Affected horses may possess a “thrifty” gene that enabled their ancestors to survive in harsh environments.

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What is the prognosis for EMS EMS in horses?

The major threat to ponies with Equine Metabolic Syndrome EMS is laminitis, and the majority of cases we diagnose will be suffering at the time of diagnosis. As long as recovery from the laminitis is achieved, then with appropriate diet and exercise the prognosis for Equine Metabolic Syndrome is good.

What causes EMS in horses?

Certain management practices such as feeding high caloric diets to relatively inactive horses can predispose a horse to EMS. Equine Metabolic Syndrome can occur at any point after a horse reaches maturity.

What tests are used to diagnose EMS in horses?

Tests for PPID such as measuring endogenous ACTH concentration or thyroid releasing hormone response test are normal in horses with EMS. Positive results indicate that the horse is concurrently affected by EMS and PPID, which can occur in older horses.

What do you feed obese horses with PPID?

Obese horses with PPID should be fed similar to horses with equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) to encourage weight loss, improve insulin sensitivity, and reduce the risk of laminitis. A forage- or fiber-based diet is ideal for obese horses with PPID to provide gut fill and supply energy in the form of volatile fatty acids.

How do you treat EMS in thinning horses?

Thin horses with EMS should receive increased calories in the form of roughage and fat. Molasses-free beet pulp, top dressing with vegetable oils, and feeding low-carbohydrate, high-fat supplements can be used until a desired body condition score is reached.

What should I Feed my EMS horse?

Providing a balanced diet with respect to vitamins and minerals is especially important, as EMS horses are in an inflammatory state and many vitamin and minerals are important antioxidants Longer term grazing may be allowed, but should be restricted by area or with use of a grazing muzzle to manage NSC intake and bodyweight

Can a thin horse with EMS have insulin dysregulation?

Although most affected horses are obese, insulin dysregulation can occur in thinner animals as well. Often, the thin horse with EMS retains some degree of abnormal regional adiposity with a relatively increased amount of fat in the neck. Courtesy of Dr. Janice Kritchevsky.

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Why are some horses more maladaptive than others?

There appears to be a genetic disposition, both within and between breeds. Affected horses may possess a “thrifty” gene that enabled their ancestors to survive in harsh environments. This increased efficiency of energy metabolism became maladaptive in modern environments with plentiful, nutrient-dense feedstuffs.

Is your horse’s metabolism efficient?

It makes sense to have an efficient metabolism if you are a wild horse in the Nevada desert, or a Shetland pony grazing scrubby heather in severe weather. This doesn’t work quite so well when the caloric needs of an energy-efficient horse are easily met (or over-met), and exercise is less than optimal.

What is the prognosis of metabolic syndrome EMS in horses?

Prognosis. The major threat to ponies with Equine Metabolic Syndrome EMS is laminitis, and the majority of cases we diagnose will be suffering at the time of diagnosis. As long as recovery from the laminitis is achieved, then with appropriate diet and exercise the prognosis for Equine Metabolic Syndrome is good.

What to do if your horse has EMS?

High levels of insulin and glucose are seen in ponies with EMS. In some cases, EMS can be present with normal blood results. These ponies require dynamic testing, where their response to glucose is measured. By far the most important treatment for Equine Metabolic Syndrome is diet and exercise.

Is your horse at risk of EMS?

The main disorder of EMS is insulin resistance and as a consequence this puts the horse at risk of laminitis and many other complex disorders 2 . Advice specific for donkeys is available from The Donkey Sanctuary .

Can EMS cause Cushing’s disease in horses?

Some researchers believe that EMS could be a contributing factor to horses developing Cushing’s disease. EMS occurs when the adipose tissue, or fat cells, produce high levels of a protein hormone called adipokines and increase the amount of cortisol being released into the body.

How do you diagnose EMS in horses?

There is currently no single diagnostic test that can definitively diagnose EMS, but elevated levels of glucose and insulin after fasting along with negative results from the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) used to diagnose Equine Cushing’s are good indicators of EMS.

How do you test for metabolic syndrome in horses?

Equine Metabolic Syndrome: Causes, Signs, Treatment and Prevention. There is currently no single diagnostic test that can definitively diagnose EMS, but elevated levels of glucose and insulin after fasting along with negative results from the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) used to diagnose Equine Cushing’s are good indicators of EMS.

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What does EMS stand for in horses?

Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) and Insulin Resistance in horses. Equine Metabolic Syndrome is a condition in horses that is characterized by Insulin Resistance (IR), obesity, and laminitis.

How much starch should I Feed my horse with PPID?

Horses and ponies with PPID will benefit from multiple small meals throughout the day as this will help to avoid peaks and troughs in blood glucose and insulin levels. We recommend feeding no more than 1g of starch per 1kg of bodyweight per meal.

What is the best forage for a horse with PPID?

NSC of hay or other forage should be 12% or less. This plan is intended to also improve insulin sensitivity and reduce the risk of laminitis. A forage or fiber-based diet is ideal for obese horses with PPID to provide gut fill and supply energy in the form of volatile fatty acids.

Can you feed a horse with pituitary intermedia dysfunction?

Feeding horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID), also known as equine Cushing’s disease, can sometimes be difficult because horses affected with PPID are often older, underweight, and may have insulin resistance with or without recurrent laminitis.

How to get rid of EMS in horses?

There are commercial feeds that are formulated specifically for horses with EMS. A chromium supplement may be recommended with a magnesium supplement to ensure that your horse is getting the recommended daily dietary dose of calcium to magnesium ratio of 2 to 1. Start an exercise program or increase daily exercise.

How do you treat equine metabolic syndrome?

Treatment for equine metabolic syndrome involves dietary management and, if diet and exercise is not sufficient to treat the condition, medical therapy. Correction of the diet may be all that is needed to return the horse to normal body weight.

What do EMS horses need to work?

Non-obese horses with EMS need energy for work, so the aim is to supply increased energy intake with low glucose and insulin responses after feeding.